The Alan Sondheim Mail Archive

August 3, 2005


---------- Forwarded message ----------
Date: Wed, 03 Aug 2005 15:27:35 +0100
From: trace@ntu.ac.uk
To: sondheim@panix.com
Subject: New at trAce - August 2005: Jackson 2bears, Sue Thomas, Gavin Stewart


*** Current trAce features

Ten Little Indians:
an interview with Jackson 2bears
Mohawk artist and hip-hop musician 2bears remixes derisive lyrics from a
children's song:  By Randy Adams
http://trace.ntu.ac.uk/Process/index.cfm?article=134

Sue Thomas: The Digital Life
Empowering others to take risks, to engage with their possible by Randy
Adams http://trace.ntu.ac.uk/Opinion/index.cfm?article=133

*** Gavin Stewart takes up post as Project Manager

trAce are pleased to announce that Gavin Stewart has now taken up his post
as Artistic Project Manager for trAce. Gavin will be taking up the reins
on a number of new trAce artistic projects. Gavin can be contacted on
gavin.stewart@ntu.ac.uk

*** Staff changes

Catherine Gillam and Kate Wilkinson left trAce in April and we are sure
you will join us in wishing them well in their future careers. Helen
Whitehead will leave at the end of August and can be contacted via her
website at helenwhitehead.com.

*** trAce Online Writing School

Due to the changes within trAce and NTU, the trAce Online Writing School
will close on August 15th.  The School has been open for five years and
has taught many hundreds of satisfied students. We would like express our
most grateful thanks to our tutors for the hard work they have put into
the School over the years and which has made the experience for the
students so worthwhile.

Many of the tutors continue to take personal tutees. If you would like to
get in touch with any of them, please let us know at trace@ntu.ac.uk.

Writing workshops and projects will continue within the main trAce forums
at

http://trace.ntu.ac.uk/forums

*** trAce Archive Launch

1st September 2005 sees the official launch of the trAce archive. trAce
has been on the web since 1995 and the site features over 5,000 pages of
content, including numerous works at the cutting edge of new media. As
part of Writers for the Future, the trAce Archive Project provides a
searchable database enabling easy online access to this extensive reposito
ry of new media writing and other resources. You will be able to explore
the hidden depths and history(ies) of trAce, both old and modern.

The archive will be presented at the Conference on Digital Resources in
the Humanities at Lancaster University (UK), 4th-7th September 2005.

*** DECADE � watch this space

This year trAce marks ten years of work in the online writing area.  We
will soon be launching a retrospective project to celebrate these ten
years.

***This newsletter can also be read online at
http://trace.ntu.ac.uk/forums/

>From the trAce Online Writing Centre http://trace.ntu.ac.uk

trAce connects writers around the world in real and virtual space. We
specialise in creativity, collaboration, learning, research, and
experimentation. We offer online courses, web design and project
management services. To receive this newsletter or to join our forums, go
to http://trace.ntu.ac.uk/forums/reg.cfm

trAce is an international centre based at Nottingham Trent University and
supported by Arts Council England.  It is a UK National Grid for Learning
approved site.





the trAce Online Writing Centre
trace@ntu.ac.uk
http://trace.ntu.ac.uk
The Nottingham Trent University
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Tel: + 44 (0) 115 848 6360
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Anthracite Casualties


The estimates of the number of men and boys dying in the anthracite
minefields of Pennsylvania from the mid 1800s through the first few
decades of the 20th century seem to vary a great deal. The particular
volume illustrated below lists 1622 deaths for the three years 1910-1912.
The fields covered a very small area, including Scranton and Wilkes-Barre,
my home town. I believe the total deaths during this period reached
50,000.

The 11 images are from an illustrated booklet, used to teach miners safety
measures, as well as limited English. Most of the miners were from Eastern
Europe. The images are from the Report of the Department of Mines in
Pennsylvania.

http://www.asondheim.org/nine mine jpgs

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